TEXTURING

In retouching an area of loss, however well the colour is matched, it will always remain visible unless its surface is textured to match the surrounding area. The more distinctive the weave or texture of the painting the more this is true.

The following steps illustrate one way of texturing the surface of a loss in order to make it more invisible.

Texturing the loss can be achieved by taking an impression from a nearby area and pressing this into a coating applied to the smooth area of loss. 

Step 3 shows the silicone impression previously taken and now being applied to the smooth surface of the loss.

Portrait of Dr R Wormell
British
20th Century
Oil on canvas
1245x845mm

1. A loss that has been filled and is ready for retouching
1. A loss that has been filled and is ready for retouching

1. A loss that has been filled and is ready for retouching

1. Loss after filling

3. Silicone impression being applied to smooth surface of loss
3. Silicone impression being applied to smooth surface of loss

3. Silicone impression being applied to smooth surface of loss

3. Silicone impression being applied to smooth surface of loss

2. The loss after retouching. It is still very visible in raking light because the weave of the surrounding original painting is so pronounced
2. The loss after retouching. It is still very visible in raking light because the weave of the surrounding original painting is so pronounced

2. The loss after retouching. It is still very visible in raking light because the weave of the surrounding original painting is so pronounced

2. LOSS AFTER RETOUCHING

4. The same area in raking light after texturing. The visibility of the loss has been much reduced
4. The same area in raking light after texturing. The visibility of the loss has been much reduced

4. The same area in raking light after texturing. The visibility of the loss has been much reduced

4. Visibility of loss has
been much reduced